Thursday, 31 October 2013

Differentiation Deviser

Seen this before, but not in this embeddable form...
Thanks to Davie Marshall for the tipoff to it.


Disease Game

Last year I wrote a unit of work on FOOD AND HEALTH for Richard Allaway's Geography all the Way website.

The resources can be obtained by GATW subscribers HERE

This new game challenges you to contain an outbreak of a disease by selective vaccination, by breaking the chain of infection.... If you are able to save a certain percentage of people from the original 100, you can progress to a harder level, or try to beat your previous personal best.
What strategies work best ?

Good for anyone studying the Geography of Disease...

Mission:Explore Water...

The team at Explorer HQ is working on this today to get it one step nearer completion... Exciting times....

SAGT 9 of 10: Edinburgh

Sunday morning was spent heading over to Edinburgh, where I had a couple of hours before my train south. There was sunshine on Leith...

Edinburgh is still undergoing disruption for the building of the tram network. This has been ongoing for as long as I can remember...

I managed to get into the National Gallery of Scotland, and wander through some familiar streets in the old city, and do a bit of shopping before getting the train south. A pity I was laden down with luggage as I could have done a little more exploring. Looked up to the ramparts from where Danny MacAskill jumped in a video which started off my career back in the classroom at the start of September...

Image: Alan Parkinson

Halloween Google Doodle

What's the Geography of Halloween ?
Put the different combinations of ingredients into the witch's cauldron for interactive animations...

Workday population change

A fascinating new visualisation from the ONS to show how the population of areas change on a working day as people move away / into the area for their commute....


I travel to East Cambridgeshire to work, and it seems I am going against the tide of people leaving the area. The population goes down by 21% on a workday as people leave the area - presumably heading for the city of Cambridge and down the commuter lines towards London...

How does the population of your area change ?

Wednesday, 30 October 2013

SAGT 8 of 10: Dundee

After the conference proceedings closed, it was over for the AGM of SAGT, notable for its free glass of wine. Val Vannet handed over the Presidency to Liz Crisp (see previous blog posts for my visit to Aberdeen to work with Liz)
Then I helped 'take down' the various materials and we headed for Dundee in the rain. We went through the Carse of Gowrie, which has plenty of soft fruit being grown to supply preserve manufacturing and also supermarkets with raspberries and other fruit.

I visited Dundee for three years while the conference was held there and know the city quite well.

That evening it was over the Tay Bridge to a restaurant called 'The View' in Wormit, which had a rather good view back across the Tay. We also passed several large oil rigs which were being commissioned, one of which had apparently recently arrived from Singapore !
Since the last time I'd visited there had been a few changes: a huge multi-storey block had been demolished, near to RSS Discovery (where a previous conference reception had been held)
This is a city that is changing and will continue to change for many years to come.

Back to have a whisky in front of the fire and doze off, knowing that we had an extra hour to lie-in as the clocks went back....

The 1987 storm and this week's side by side...

A good resource from the BBC, with thanks to Sarah Black for the tipoff....
Comparison of the two storms... : 2013 and 1987


Here's a Met Office review of the storm too....

There has been some activity in the geography community with colleagues preparing resources related to the storm.

David Rogers created a map where people could add an entry as to where the effects were being felt.

WOW Geography (which I'm going to be involved in next year) also shared a resource in the shape of a Living Graph activity...

Simon Jones has been working on a nice new resource too - waiting for that to appear on Slideshare... will let you know when it does :)

The village of Grundisburgh in Suffolk has just been on the news, where there is still no power, and some of the buildings in Ipswich which I visited recently on the GCSE Fieldtrip were damaged.

Image made available under Creative Commons license by Flickr user Simon Ingram.
Thanks for sharing the image and making it available for educational use.

Child Poverty study

We live in unequal times... As we move into a winter during which many pensioners are worrying about heating their homes, this report on child poverty from the Children's Society.


Click the link to download the report summary as a PDF.

The Guardian article describes some of the findings, and many colleagues will be teaching students who are experiencing some elements of child poverty. Worrying times...

How can that be explored within the geography curriculum...


SAGT 7 of 10: Afternoon keynote...

After sorting out the room that I'd been using so the teacher whose room it was wouldn't be cursing me on the Monday, I went down to the lecture theatre for the afternoon keynote.
This was given by Professor Rob Duck, who works at the University of Dundee.

Rob has written an excellent book on the impact of coastal changes in locations around the UK.
It explores a number of locations around Scotland and the rest of the British Isles, and he touched on a few places close to home such as Happisburgh and Bacton.

Rob's keynote was a humorous and informative look at how the problems that face our coasts are not new, and started out with a great Daily Mail comments page on a story about coastal erosion...

The book looks really good too. I flicked through a copy while in Dundee... Worth seeking out...

A great way to bookend the seminars that had also taken place in addition to mine.

SAGT 6 of 10: My seminars...

My seminars are available to view on my SLIDESHARE page.



I referred to Paul Cornish’s useful diagram from the GA’s curriculum planning site, which asks questions relating to the choice of case studies.
Hopefully these move away from ‘the one in the textbook’… and are influenced by student and teacher choice and also experiences.

I used the idea from Doreen Massey’s lecture where she referred to mountains themselves as ‘migrants’ in that they were constantly moving and changing, and how maps are a surface on which millions of stories are told.

The idea of curriculum making came through, as did the idea of telling stories. Geography means 'writing the Earth' of course, and there are lots of opportunities for this to happen in familiar landscapes. I talked about teaching about mountains in the Fens, where the highest point was only 26m above sea level.

I used an extract from Robert MacFarlane's 'The Old Ways' along with 'Digimap for Schools'

There were also some ideas from Noel Jenkins on ‘grabbing’ and appropriating landscapes using Google SketchUp – which he added to with models from the SketchUp Warehouse.
I mentioned Tony Cassidy's Facebook idea with Liz Smith examples.

Dropbox folder of resources was shared with the delegates. Thanks to the fifty or so delegates who chose to come to my session...


If you would like to have access to the main written resource, drop me a line...

SAGT 5 of 10: Joy Tivy Education Medal

After Iain Stewart's lecture, Mike Robinson of the RSGS came to the front. He had come to extend fraternal greetings from the Society but had also come to award a medal to somebody in the audience.

The Tivy medal is not awarded every year, and is awarded for outstanding contributions to Geography and education.
Previous winners that I could find were:

2008 - Jim Carson

2009 - Erica Caldwell

2010 - Anita Ganeri

2011 - Scottish Association of Geography Teachers

Val showed me the Tivy medal that the SAGT had been awarded in 2011, and this was a heavy bronze medal. Mike Robinson read out a citation describing the person judged to have been worthy of being presented with the medal this year, and it turns out it was me!
It was presented by Professor Iain Stewart, who is the President of the Society.

Along with the medal, there was a very nice certificate of honorary fellowship.


What was equally important to me was to read and hear the comments of others who were there, who appreciated the work that I've created, and shared over the years....


SAGT 4 of 10: Val's Presidential speech and morning keynote...

After the awards, delegates moved into a lecture theatre for the morning session: a welcome by Shelagh Hansom the conference convener, and a local officer from the 'education authority'.

Val Vannet, the outgoing president gave an excellent speech: 'It's not what you're looking at, it's what you see that matters', which had some of the images from her recent holiday in the USA, and gave the message that geography changes your view on the world.

She entertainingly went through the progress (or not) that has been made in Scottish education towards 'Curriculum for Excellence', which has had a long gestation period, and also the recent updates at National 4 and 5 level and the Advanced Highers.
The conference was on the theme of Physical Geography, and Val's contention was that this has largely disappeared from the specifications, and is not leading to a joined-up offering for students. She showed the advice on studying soils (which has virtually disappeared), such as 'dig a soil pit on the school grounds' (which will of course have been disturbed when the school was built...) or use a Russian corer (which is apparently completely inappropriate for the task as well as being potentially dangerous - assuming you can find one...)
There were lots of nodding heads in the audience. It was a powerful and passionate speech, and set the tone for the day nicely: Physical Geography matters...

The morning keynote was given by Professor Iain Stewart

Called 'Scotland Rocks', it explored the way that Scotland has been at the centre of many geological discoveries as well as industrial developments based on these.

Oil shales – lighting the streets of London, and the link with exploring climate change were all part of the mix, beautifully presented with attractive images and text.

At the end, there were questions about fracking, and whether it was a suitable development.

Iain also said he's working on a three part series on North Sea Oil, ahead of the 50th anniversary of its discovery and exploitation - this changed large parts of Scotland utterly...
A really good start to the day...

Northern Rocks 2014

Tickets went on sale at 9am today for Northern Rocks.
For more information about the event, go HERE.

Sound good ? 
Got £25 ? 
Buy a ticket HERE but be quick....

Tuesday, 29 October 2013

Suns of the Tundra

Post by Suns of the Tundra.

Thanks to Simon Oakes for sending details of this. I've shared it elsewhere, but adding it here too...
Check out the 'Tunguska' album for some geography oriented rock !

Collins Atlas - UN Globe - FREE download today only...

 One of the (many) things I did last year was travel down to the offices of Collins to see a preview of their marvellous ATLAS by COLLINS app, and give them some thoughts on how to support teachers in appreciating its value, and also making it available within schools.


TODAY ONLY you have a chance to get the UN Globe for free.
The app comes with one globe pre-installed and includes 10 other globes that can be downloaded (these will cost you money as an in-app purchase)

The free download is available to celebrate the launch of the World Heritage globe.
With the World Heritage globe:
§  Discover the locations of all 981 UNESCO World Heritage sites.
§  Learn about the criteria for inscription on the World Heritage List.
§  Read a detailed description of each site.
§  View over 650 stunning photographs.
§  Find out more with web links to further information and photographs.
Other globes provide information on the UNESCO Memory of the World programme, and themes such as development, the economy, physical maps, the environment, communications and more. Each globe allows you to see themed information presented in beautiful mapping and graphics.
The link below will  direct users to the local iTunes store in the countries where it is available.
smarturl.it/atlasbycollins

You'll need an up to date iPhone / tablet and quite a lot of space...

Monday, 28 October 2013

SAGT 3 of 10: Arrival at the conference and Awards....

After breakfast it was over early to the conference venue: the North Inch Community Campus. The first of three years that it will be held there. There were over 200 delegates attending, and there were the traditional bacon butties and coffee to start...

The exhibitors were already setting up the stalls.




The delegates were collecting their goodie bags. These are always excellent at the SAGT - I remember the ones in Dundee that had a jute bag, pot of jam and a copy of the Beano (journalism) to represent the 3 Js that built the city....
This time round they included a calendar, books, copy of 'The Geographer' (the RSGS journal), a pencil and a poke of sweets, all in a rather good jute bag...


I set up my seminar room that I was going to be using, and made sure that the ICT all worked and the handouts were placed on the desks, and then went back downstairs for a coffee, and chat to Duncan Hawley. It was then time for the SAGT awards.

The SAGT awards are similar to the GA awards.
There are non-book and book categories, and I ended up being quite well represented here....

In the SAGT awards, our Mission:Explore pack on Iceland, which was written for Discover the World was commended.

Well done to John Sayers, who co-wrote the missions, and Helen Steer and Tom Morgan Jones for design, editing and illustration work.


... and then it came to the winner of the SAGT BOOK AWARD....
The overall winner of this was 'Fieldwork through Enquiry', which I co-wrote with John Widdowson...
The certificate was picked up by Hazel Barrett, the president of the GA.

A good start to the day !

Images: John Vannet and Alan Parkinson

Another new blog...

Always happy to publicise new (and old) blogs by geography teachers...
This one is by Mr Irwin @GeographyMrI

Read the first post HERE

Why not start your own blog ?

SAGT 2 of 10: Perth and the RSGS

Up after a good night's sleep and opened the curtains onto a soggy scene...
Had breakfast and worked as the traffic swished along the M8 through the city...

Wandered to the station - was intending to wander up Sauchiehall Street and enjoy the city but it was pouring with rain...
Into the Buchanan Galleries for a while, then got on the train to Perth. Arrived to find it was, er... pouring with rain...

Hung around for a while then walked into the city centre, and sat out the rain in a pub....
It finally stopped raining, and I had a wander around Perth, which was once the capital of Scotland. The Tay was high and turbulent under the bridge, which had the levels of previous flooding (some quite recently) marked onto it.
Taxi out to my hotel, and worked through the afternoon, then met up with Val and John Vannet, and down to chat to Iain Stewart, the Caldwells and the Hansoms who are familiar faces from previous trips up to SAGT conference.

We were off for a pre-conference reception at the Royal Scottish Geographical Society.
They have headquarters in Perth in a building which is the oldest in the city, and has been renovated wonderfully. It's the sort of base that the GA should have, rather than Solly Street. It's a gem of a building, and has fascinating exhibits which are shown off for the visitors (I remember coming across various wonderful Vaughan Cornish prints in the basement of Solly St which would have been better on the walls...)

We had a few glasses of wine and chatted - good to see another friend Duncan Hawley had come up for the conference too.
Chatted to Mike and Fiona from the RSGS and had the tour of the building.
Up to the rather wonderful Explorers Room, which had some wonderful artefacts from the past, including when Sir Ernest Shackleton was the secretary of the Society, and also a globe marked with the initials of Roald Amundsen. The room is lined with books and quotes and remnants from previous explorations - a fascinating and atmospheric room.
This was followed by a meal in Perth, and back to the hotel for a wee dram of Laphroaig - then bed to prepare for the conference tomorrow...

Image: Alan Parkinson / RSGS

Concretopia

Another book to add to the growing pile of ones for the Christmas stocking (or perhaps my 50th birthday which comes 4 days later...)
Concretopia is written by John Grindrod, who also writes the excellent Dirty Modern Scoundrel blog.

As a child of the 60s and 70s, this was a time when a lot of these developments took place, changing the cities I was familiar with at the time: Sheffield and Leeds in particular...

Energy Dashboard

I've been watching this site for a few weeks now since I heard about it, and related it to work done on Energy.

The site has a dashboard which shows how the UK's energy is being generated. How much is coming from each source - see trends in that, and also trends in demand. Can you track the impact of colder or milder weather during the winter ?

Watch out for the wind turbines spinning around at the moment - possibly too fast.

The J R James Image Archive

Produced by the University of Sheffield, and funded by the Alumni fund.
A wealth of historic image of urban developments in Sheffield and beyond. 
Wonderful for anyone teaching about urban change, redevelopment, new towns and related topics.
A gem for human geographers...


SAGT 1 of 10: Glasgow and Gabriel

This is the first of 10 posts summing up my trip to the SAGT conference at the North Inch Community Campus in Perth.
I've been heading up to SAGT since 2005, but this trip was extra special.
As part of the conference, I was presented with the Joy Tivy Education Medal and an honorary fellowship of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society by Professor Iain Stewart.
More on that in a future post.

The journey up was very smooth. A very early booking of tickets meant a bargain first class seat, and although I risked 'getting used to it' as Bob Digby said it was nice to be served with food and drinks and drink a chilled ale while watching the Northumberland coast go by.

On arrival at Edinburgh, I caught the connecting train to Glasgow - cup of tea and shortcake while crossing to Queen Street, from where I walked to the hotel where I was staying, which had an excellent wide ranging view over the western side of the city.

It was a glorious evening and sunset, and wandered along the Clyde. A previous time I'd been here was for the SAGT conference, and spent a very chilly evening taking pictures with Noel Jenkins. This time round, it was warmer and I wandered and had some food and very nice Innis and Gunn ale in a nearby bar. I then made my way over to the Hydro. A few of the pictures I took below:



The Hydro is a new venue.
It will host the gymnastics for the Commonwealth Games, which will take place in 2014. It was lit up from the outside. Got my seat and after a wait, and support, it was Peter Gabriel.
I saw him live in 1987 for the 'So' tour, and this was a tour to celebrate that album 25 years on with a full run through of the album, plus some very special other songs...
It was a great evening, and a great way to start a special Scottish weekend...

Sunday, 27 October 2013

#UKSTORM2013

It's on its way...
Follow the various Twitter feeds and other stories as the storm approaches, as well as the usual news channels...

This has the potential to claim lives, so I'd never say that I was 'hoping it will be a good case study', but students WILL have stories of this storm when the new half term starts...
Will geography departments use it as a context for some learning, mapwork, work on resilience, extreme weather, debates over why it wasn't a hurricane, or whether storms like this will get more common in the future...

Add your pin to the crowdsourced map, a variation on the #UKSnow maps of previous winters....

And stay safe !

I'm hoping to get home before the worst of the winds hit Norfolk...



Friday, 25 October 2013

Geography Pages

Back in 2001 I started a website called GeographyPages. It was the 2nd attempt, after an earlier go using the free Tripod hosting service back in 1999 ish....
Within a few years, it was getting over a million page views a year and more, and was costing me more and more in bandwidth. It became my main online space, where I could store resources and weblinks...

Over time, I moved to blogging in 2002, and then other spaces such as Twitter.

Earlier in the year, when reviewing my activity, and the need to renew hosting again, I decided to take the site down, and opened the domain up to another possible owner....

The site is now hosted by Richard Allaway, and currently acts as a gateway to our online activities. There are links to my blogs, and to Geography all the Way, which I have contributed some content to over the years.
Richard and I also continue to offer a consultancy service for CPD on request...


You can also catch Richard in London leading a CPD course in association with the Geographical Association for IB Geography.

GeographyPages is dead..... long live GeographyPages  :)

New curriculum planning...

The GA's page to support teachers preparing for the new curriculum has been beefed up now with some new content - the first of a greater batch of pages as we move through towards 2014.
There's plenty of important and helpful detail in the pages, including planning tools, such as this diagram exploring some of the important questions that departments need to be asking.

The latest batch makes good use of Eleanor Rawling's excellent book on planning a new KS3 curriculum from last time round. Although we aren't quite as focussed on concepts this time round, the sequence of planning, and the importance of enquiry are just as important.

Worth bookmarking and revisiting from time to time....

Wednesday, 23 October 2013

Tomorrow....

Will mostly be travelling by train and seeing this gentleman.
First seen over 25 years ago, and many times since then...


Ready for SAGT13

I had a shock earlier...
Went to finalise my presentation for SAGT and discovered that I'd saved a blank presentation over it... goodbye to the images and research and thoughts that I'd put down over the last few months...
So, I had to start again.
Inevitably this meant a slight change in direction and I went back to my original notes that I'd made and found I'd taken a bit of a tangent...

Adding in some new sections based on the original idea, which was taken from 2 books:
'The Old Ways' - Robert MacFarlane
'The Living Mountain - Nan Shepherd

It makes use of DIGIMAP FOR SCHOOLS with a new resource on the Cairngorms.

Will also be showing KML download from searches on GEOGRAPH to have geo-located images in Google Earth.
Also a quick mention for an idea from Noel Jenkins which may get squeezed in: grabbing a mountain with SketchUp and adding some models...

Creating Virtual landscapes in Google Earth and SketchUp.doc

When I receive the Joy Tivy Education medal from the RSGS at the conference (did I mention that recently) it will be partly because of the work of Noel and others that I'm able to be there...

Exciting...

Tour De France 2014 stages in Yorkshire revealed - no surprise they go over Holme Moss.....



Cairngorms Pinterest page...

Ready for SAGT at the weekend...
Images and ideas for teaching about The Cairngorms.
Curation and pupil agency ahoy!

Tuesday, 22 October 2013

New fieldwork book gets the seal of approval

From the legend that is last year's GA President Bob Digby...


Available to buy from the GA Shop.

Half term...

So, I've managed to survive the first half term back in teaching...
I've taught about 100 lessons or so. Some of them were quite good I reckon.
I've drunk a lot of coffee and had thousands more conversations than I would normally have in that space of time.
A few moments to remember:
- assemblies in Ely Cathedral and listening to the choristers on various occasions
- GCSE Geography fieldtrip to Flatford Mill, with a wander around Ipswich exploring the dock development and some amusing conversations and encounters
- trying, and succeeding in getting Apple TV working when my projector bulb went in the middle of an observation
- making use of iPads - learnt a lot about workflow and device management, which I'll be putting into some materials for some courses I'm running from December onwards
- back to being on the other side of the desk for Parents' evenings
- some creative moments from students, particularly the penguin and killer whale animations for the Encyclopaedia Antarctica, and some of the cities in boxes.
- overheard being called an 'awesome teacher'... at least I think that's what they said...
- enthusiastic audiences for various events, and good lessons on Shackleton's boat trip, and 'Touching the Void'

I'm not sure I've been 'Outstanding' that often (apart from when I'm on duty in the playground) but it's been interesting how quickly I got into the routines, and also how quickly the term has gone so far.

Thanks to the students at King's Ely, and my new colleagues, particularly my HoD Claire.

Follow the story over at my teaching blog: Geography Teacher 2 point 0

Remember this...

Some news about the seminal GeographyPages website coming soon...
2001 - ?

Original image by Mark Jarvis

Thought for the Day

Via Jennie Denton


Monday, 21 October 2013

Follow the (spooky) things...

Right now, supermarkets around the country are filling with Hallowe'en tat....
Here's some we bought earlier.

Sorry about the injury to the skeleton but I dropped a can of beans on its head...

The Follow the Things website has all gone spooky, and is offering to tell the 'tales from beyond the halloween decorations'....

Get your trick or treat bag now...

I'm going to be blogging in November for the Follow the Things blog.

Check out the CLASSROOM resources which I spent a lot of the summer creating along with Prof Ian Cook.

Heading North...

Packing my case for a trip North... first overnight trip since I started back in the classroom at the end of August.
It's my annual trip up to the SAGT conference.


This will be made extra special by the bonus of being awarded the Joy Tivy Education Medal by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society at some point in the conference...
Heard about this a couple of weeks ago, which was a great surprise, and a wonderful honour. I'd better take my suit...


My presentation is on the Cairngorms, using Digimap for Schools to explore them...

Check out my Cairngorms PINTEREST page.

Resources will be available online after the event....

Working...

Rain falling outside... first day of half term and working on a report which has to be finished later today... and a few other things I'll blog later...
Music to work by...

We're the best at...

This map has been doing the rounds since I first saw it last week, and meant to shove it here, so here's a lunchtime treat for you.
The things that each country does best...

Reminds me of this map that was around a few years ago from Information is Beautiful...

Sunday, 20 October 2013

Leap Motion....

New in... my latest toy... I mean, pedagogical gadget...

Leap Motion allows me to control certain programmes and functions on my MacBook Air with a flick of my fingers...
I've installed the software and had a go with Google Earth - need to get the gestures right...
Also need to work out the best apps on the AIRSPACE store and get them working on my Mac.

Think I might show it at the SAGT conference next week too...


Excited at the prospect of NOKIA HERE maps....

Just flying over Barcelona and other cities with a wave of my hand....


This could be an excellent way to explore Urban Geographies...


More to come soon...

New curriculum...

On the first half day of half term, of which more later, I headed down to London for the Secondary Phase Committee meeting of the Geographical Association.

I always love meeting up with a group of wonderful and excellent teachers who challenge me professionally... and laugh at my jokes...
In addition to planning our three workshops for the conference next year (I'm doing a short input into one of our workshops on literacy) we also talked about the new curriculum plans.
We are all going to be writing about our plans for the new curriculum in 2014. Mine have been shared over on my new teaching blog, but will also draw them together again in a further blog post next week...

The redoubtable Simon Renshaw has been quick off the mark, and has already posted his planning and inspirations up on the Soar Geography blog, and it sets a very high standard for the rest of us to follow.

Read it HERE and get ahead of the game...

Thursday, 17 October 2013

Iktsuarpok

Thanks to Moira Jenkins for the link to this page with a number of words which can't be translated... except with these wonderful illustrations...
Particularly interested in the ones related to place...

Fenland Celery

Four days a week in term time, I make my way across the Fens, crossing the border between Norfolk and Cambridgeshire. I've seen some amazing sunsets, towering thunderheads and thick fog so far, and there are many frosty mornings to come through the winter ahead...
One of the areas I pass: around Southery, is particularly associated with the cultivation of Fenland Celery.
Yesterday, on World Food Day, I heard on the radio that this food crop has now gained Protected Geographical Indicator status with the EU.

I have blogged about this several times before.

We are now in Fenland Celery season, and it's a pity that in several of the supermarkets that I checked they didn't have any in stock... Will try a few shops in Ely tomorrow...

This Government page listing the products needs updating too...

ONS Flickr Stream

Thanks for the lead to this earlier today.
Flickr galleries of ONS visualisations of regional data.

Here's the East of England, where I live and work...
Copyright as on the image... 

Adventure Landscapes

Thanks to all those who contributed to my survey on Adventurous activities that had been carried out and the link with places, towards the end of the summer holiday in preparation for the new term...
Here are all the results summarised from Google Drive...

Painting the town red...

... and yellow, and green, and ...

Thanks for the tipoff to this awesome Kickstarter project which aims to turn a favela into a work of art...
How is this for urban rebranding (or redecoration at least...)

One for the Rio2014 scheme of work which we can now start planning after the match on Tuesday night....

Wednesday, 16 October 2013

My latest publication...

Yesterday got sent a link to a new publication that I've been working on along with Karl Donert for some time. It's an e-book with gathers together a range of case studies from the DIGITALEARTH project which I was involved with for several years, and which allowed me to work with a great many wonderful European colleagues from schools, colleges and Universities across the EU. It was sad to miss the final meeting for the project at the GeoFort near Amsterdam a few weeks ago.
The book can be obtained from this link.


Homeward Bound

An awesome film which tells the story of someone's search for home...


Thanks to Noeleen Leahy for the tipoff to the film, which was apparently released yesterday...
A great starter for lessons on Google Earth and the power of mapping...

Dan and Seb in London - hot ticket...

I hope you've been following the journeys of Dan and Seb Raven Ellison as they take part in their Route 125 exploration of the UK in their RAV4.

They are now preparing for an event at the National Geographic store in November, and I have my ticket booked.

To celebrate National Geographic's 125th anniversary National Geographic Emerging Explorer and Guerrilla Geographer Daniel Raven-Ellison is just back from completing 125 adventures across the UK with his son Seb.
Come to Daniel's amusing talk as he takes us on a journey through the UK from the Lizard in Cornwall to Unst in Shetland with his son Seb and a Toyota RAV4.
Packed with photos and videos from this extraordinary micro-expedition, Daniel and Seb will be sharing stories and tips for adventuring with parents and kids.