Monday, 8 July 2013

Learning from the lessons of history...

Or should that be the CPD of history (teachers)

The SHP (Schools History Project) conference took place over the last few days in Leeds, and there was plenty of interest in the twitter stream, which was very active, thanks to several people who were sharing their experiences...

I really didn't have the time to do as much following and clicking links as I did, but who needs sleep :)

I'm grateful to John Heffernan, Russel Tarr and other folks who tweeted from the event, and provided a good list of new ideas to explore and develop. There was a real focus on teaching and learning. I picked up some excellent ideas that can certainly be used in geography as well as they can in History, with a little tweaking of context. There was a slide from a presentation which suggested what departments could usefully focus on in the year that we have to prepare for the new curriculum because of its disapplication.

It was good to see some excellent work done by Dale Banham, down in Suffolk. Dale invited me to the Suffolk Geography conference several times, and I worked with him on some video work in a Suffolk school that had gained our SGQM to look at why there were so successful in their geography.
There are some adaptable ideas here, which draw on work by John Hattie, Ron Berger and others and connect with some recent reading.

I also liked the introduction to one of the sessions (I presume) with the quote: "We could have been anything we wanted to be...." ...

I like the idea of using snakes and ladders of different sizes to represent progress...
I liked this progression graph
I liked some literacy ideas for peer assessment

It was also interesting to read some of the things being said by Michael Maddison, the Chief HMI for History. Any ideas here are transferable to the inspection of other subjects to some degree. The following is based on tweets and may have misrepresented his exact words..

I liked the statement that using 'Most, some etc' for differentiation is a cop-out...
He also said there is 'no' requirement to show progress explicitly in lessons at any time...
If they're learning in the lesson, progress is implicit - they want to see good teaching...
Provide subject and topic specific feedback...
Replace the words historical with geographical on this slide - powerful stuff...

If you're quick, and head over to the #SHP25 hashtag you'll be able to see other outcomes from the event and follow the links. Plenty of Twitpics...

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