Tuesday, 13 May 2014

GA Conference 2015 - Manchester

Final follow-up blogpost following the GA Conference 2014....

I know that the 2014 conference has only just finished, but during the conference in Guildford I spoke to Mark Higginbottom, the Senior Vice President, who will be GA President during next year, about next year's event, which he is heavily involved with of course.
It will take place between the 9th and 11th of April (which is a bonus as it misses my daughter's birthday)

Here's the theme...

Making an impact


In 2015 the GA’s Annual Conference will return to the University of Manchester on Thursday 9-Saturday 11 April.
What impact does geography, as a subject and academic discipline, have on young people? Asked if geography helps young people shape an understanding and appreciation of the world around them, whoever they are, wherever they live and whatever their academic interests, I believe we would all immediately respond with a resounding ‘yes!’; but do we really know the impact geography has on shaping them as ‘well rounded’ human beings?
The theme of ‘Making an Impact’ provides an opportunity to reflect on the geography young people encounter and engage with and the relevance it has to their everyday lives and experiences, be they EYFS, primary, secondary, post-16 or HEI students and whatever their ethnicity or socio-economic background.
A 2009 IPSOS MORI poll provided some illuminating perceptions of geography by young people and helped guide the Geographical Association in its strategic thinking over the last five years. As we move forward with the next five year strategic plan, young people appear explicitly in the priorities that will guide the work and activities of the association. The theme provides a sounding board to think about and share the ways we currently directly engage with young people, for example through Worldwise, and how we will in the future.
The time is right to take stock, seek the views of young people and celebrate success. How do we ensure geography is seen by young people to be much more than just another school subject or academic discipline? It is these people that teachers, educators and the Geographical Association must understand and support: they become the next generation to have stewardship of our landscapes and environments, whatever their adult lives become.

I've been asked to do a few things already, so I will see you there...

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