Sunday, 6 March 2016

Glocalisation - I'm loving it...


Thanks to Miss Stockings for the lead to another McDonalds resource for glocalisation.

Richard Allaway has previously shared images of meals that he has eaten in various McDonalds restaurants he has eaten in where the standard menu that is familiar the world over (the globalised version) is adapted for the local market (glocalisation) 

According to this very useful Open University page, glocalisation (which Blogger 'helpfully' keeps correcting to globalisation whenever I type it) is related to the following:

‘Glocalisation’ combines the words ‘globalisation’ and ‘localisation’ to emphasise the idea that a global product or service is more likely to succeed if it is adapted to the specific requirements of local practices and cultural expectations. The term started to appear in academic circles in the late 1980s, when Japanese economists used it in articles published by the Harvard Business Review. For the sociologist Roland Robertson, who is often credited with popularising the term: ‘glocalization means the simultaneity – the co-presence – of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies’ (Robertson, 1997, p. 4).‘Glocalisation’ combines the words ‘globalisation’ and ‘localisation’ to emphasise the idea that a global product or service is more likely to succeed if it is adapted to the specific requirements of local practices and cultural expectations. The term started to appear in academic circles in the late 1980s, when Japanese economists used it in articles published by the Harvard Business Review. For the sociologist Roland Robertson, who is often credited with popularising the term: ‘glocalization means the simultaneity – the co-presence – of both universalizing and particularizing tendencies’ (Robertson, 1997, p. 4).

The resource is a food blog called Travelling McDs, which is written by James McGowan who records the meals eaten on his global travels, which are quite extensive.
He has eaten a number of meals which are adapted for the local palate, or to celebrate some aspect of the local culture.
Worth checking out - there are plenty of alternatives to the Big Mac here...

Image: McDonalds at Disneyland Paris - image by Alan Parkinson

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