Sunday, 5 June 2016

What's the melting point of Lego?

It was suggested to me yesterday that it's just over 100 degrees Celsius.
Google that phrase and it returns this:

ABS maximum temperature is 80°C (176°F) and melt at 105°C (221°F)
Polycarbonate plastic used for transparent bricks melt at 267°C (512.6°F)


I went over to Southwold yesterday, and found that there is now a whole new range of sets of volcano scientists in the Lego City Explorers series.
They drive funky vehicles with compass logos on the front, and wear rugged clothes... They are pictured on the boxes investigating volcanoes. They have vehicles and helicopters, and equipment. 

It would be interesting to find out what research Lego did before putting the sets together, and what the scientists are actually supposed to be doing? Perhaps they're researching a system for volcano early warning? That would be helpful for sure...
Here's a full breakdown of the various sets.


It also gave me an idea for student tasks, based around designing scenarios for other geography-related places for these explorers to go.

Which brings me back to the title of the post. This is quite a scary thing for a Lego figure to be doing, standing so close to molten lava :) 
That's how cool these explorers are - they do it in the name of science and exploration.

2 comments:

mary said...

i didnt know about this.ABS maximum temperature is 80°C (176°F) and melt at 105°C (221°F)
Polycarbonate plastic used for transparent bricks melt at 267°C (512.6°F)but now i know.

Geo said...

Interesting Fact.